Cooking with play dough

We recently gave the children different spices and herbs to place in play dough. Then we used the play dough to “cook” their ingredients. One particular student made coffee and spent the entire morning making many different things for her friends. Once her friends saw her creating a “home atmosphere” with dinner and food preparations, the rest of the classroom wanted to join in and help. It turned into the role of a family and they pretended to act like they were at home. They even tried to tell time and discussed the concept when it was time to eat! One child in particular began in this area on her own and as they observed what she was doing, they related and all joined in and played very well with one another.

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According to scholastic.com, young children learn by imagining and doing. Have you ever watched your child pick up a stone and pretend it is a zooming car, or hop a Lego across the table as if it were a person or a bunny? Your child is using an object to represent something else while giving it action and motion. But this pretend play is not as simple as it may seem. The process of pretending builds skills in many essential developmental areas.

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