Carrots

To continue the infant’s study of food and food exploration, they played with carrots last week! The infants particularly enjoyed the green leafy parts and loved shaking it the carrot back and forth in their hands. The children were curious about the contrasting textures and colors of found in the carrot and enjoyed nibbling on the vegetable.

In the photos below, you can see them grasping onto the leafy green stem, gnawing on the end of the carrot, and having fun playing with the vegetable!

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Our goal with this continued project is to provide contrasting fruits/vegetables in order for the children to experience contrasting sensory experiences when playing, tasting, feeling, smelling, and observing them! Sensory play is incredibly important for children, especially at this young of an age, because it allows them to work on their fine motor skills, cognitive development, social development, language acquisition, and allow them to experience the world and develop the knowledge on their own terms. According to Rachelle Doorley, when infants first interact with the world, they don’t have the language skills to describe what they encounter, so they rely on absorbing information through their senses.

“As babies mature, their awareness becomes heightened. A once “content” or “easy” baby may suddenly take fright at loud noises, be annoyed by a wet diaper, or reject the texture of a new food. These changes may confuse or frustrate parents, but they can also signify developmental maturity as the child begins to make sense of the world.” 

Our food exploration project provides sensory activities for the infants that encourage the development of their curiosity, experimentation, cause-and-effect testing, and overall awareness of this new and wonderful world around them!

To read our previous blog posts on this food exploration study:

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